Tag Archives: Alentejo

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There are no certainties as to the origin of the name Évora. The prevailing theory says that it probably came from the Celt word eburos, meaning yew tree. Judging by the name one could say it was a close cousin to the city of York in England, known in former times as Ebora Kon, or the place of the Yew trees. In the 1st century A.D., Évora was known as Ebora Cerealis, in a reference to the cereal crops that grew around it.

But even if we can’t be sure about its origins, we know ...continue reading

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Well… the folks in Portugal may not fully agree with that saying. In the last couple years the country started getting significant travel media coverage and awards. In the last few months alone the likes of AOL, USA Today, Condé Nast and others have placed Portugal and some of its hidden gems at the top of the ranks:

Best country to ...continue reading

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It’s not news that some of the best materials in the world come from nature. What if we told you there’s a natural material, which is used in multiple industries and is both light and resistant, waterproof, environmentally-friendly and cheap? What if we also told you this material comes largely from Portugal?

When traveling in Portugal, visitors are bound to notice the omnipresence of cork. This is no wonder since ...continue reading

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Over 8,000 years of history have shaped one of the most intriguing regions in Portugal: Alentejo. One of the best examples, the Cromeleque dos Almendres is a magnificent structure made of 95 monoliths displaying engravings which are geometrical or astral in character. Although many questions about these types of monuments remain unanswered, several of the prevailing theories around these monoliths with many millennia relate them to an astral cult. You can travel around the region and see hundreds of other monuments preceding 3,000 BC including: dolmens (passage graves), cromlechs (megalithic enclosures) and menhirs (standing stones).

If the megalithic era left the region populated with these puzzling stone structures, the Roman occupation (from the 2nd century BC to the 5th century) has resulted in a region with ...continue reading